Business footprint diagrams

A business footprint diagram describes the links between business goals, organizational units, business functions and services, and maps these functions to the technical components delivering the required capability.

A business footprint diagram provides clear traceability between a technical component and the business goal that it satisfies, whilst also demonstrating ownership of the services identified.

A business footprint diagram demonstrates only the key facts linking organization unit functions to delivery services, and is utilized as a communication platform for senior-level (CxO) stakeholders. It must be focused on the current business interest: depending on the focus, it can concentrate on one or several application components (that need evolution) or on one or more business functions.

business-footprint-diagram
Business footprint diagram focused on the "sales" function

business-service-32Business service: Represents a service provided by the business, which may then be realized by one or more IS services.

entity-componentEntity application component: An entity component is frequently derived from business entities, and is responsible for managing the access to the entity, and its integrity.

functionFunction: Describes one function of the organization.

process-componentProcess application component: A process application component is responsible for a business process execution. It orchestrates the tasks of the process.

organization-unitOrganization unit: Describes one unit that breaks down the organization of the enterprise. This can be, for example, a department.

togaf-process-32Business process: As presented in process maps (event diagrams). The business process is detailed in flow diagrams.

support-linkSupports link: Determines that a service or process is supported by finer-grained elements such as other services or processes, or application elements.

participates-linkParticipates in link: Describes in which part or activity of the enterprise a participant intervenes.

trace-linkTrace link: General purpose tracebility link. Determines that the origin of the trace has been founded on the trace destination during its definition.

component-realizationComponent realization: An application component realizes the designated element, for example a business process.

Business service/information diagrams

The business service/information diagram shows the information needed to support one or more business services. The business service/information diagram shows what data is consumed or produced by a business service and may also show the source of information. The business service/information diagram shows an initial representation of the information present within the architecture and therefore forms a basis for elaboration and refinement within phase C (data architecture).

By using "flow" dependencies between  business services and business entities, this diagram represents which kind of entity is used or produced by the services.

This diagram presents the links between business services and business entities.

business-service-information-diagram
Three business services are based on four business entities

business-entityBusiness Entity: Describes the semantics of the entities in the business, independently of any IS consideration (e.g. storage, technology, etc.).

business-service-32Business service: Represents a service provided by the business, which may then be realized by one or more IS services.

flow-linkFlow link between data (e.g. business entity, event, product) and active elements (e.g. business process, service)

Event diagrams

Also called "process maps".

The purpose of the event diagram is to depict the relationship between events and process. Certain events, such as the arrival of certain information (for example, a customer submits a sales order) or a certain point in time (for example, end of fiscal quarter) cause work and certain actions need to be undertaken within the business. These are often referred to as business events or simply events, and are considered as triggers for a process. It is important to note that the event has to trigger a process and generate a business response or result.

Event diagrams provide an overview of processes, which helps in their mapping. Event diagrams present a general view of processes, trigger events, sent events, participating roles or organization units, as well as received or sent products. At this macroscopic level, there is no sequence between processes, even if we are able to see that the products sent by a process can be re-used by another process.

event-diagram
Event diagrams provide an overview of business processes

external-actor-32External actor: An actor that is external to the enterprise.

internal-actor-32Internal actor: An actor that belongs to the enterprise.

organization-unitOrganization unit: Describes one unit that breaks down the organization of the enterprise. This can be, for example, a department.

togaf-process-32Business process: As presented in process maps (event diagrams). The business process is detailed in flow diagrams.

togaf-product-32Product: A product is produced or consumed by business processes.

business-event-32Business event: A business event triggers a business process or is generated by a business process.

information-flowInformation flow: Defines the flow of any kind of information (business entity, event, product, informal, etc) between active entities of the enterprise.

participates-linkParticipates in link: Describes in which part or activity of the enterprise a participant intervenes.

initiator-of-linkInitiator of link: The origin participant initiates the designated process. It starts the process by realizing a task or activity in it.

Functional decomposition diagrams

The purpose of the functional decomposition diagram is to show on a single page the capabilities of an organization that are relevant to the consideration of an architecture. By examining the capabilities of an organization from a functional perspective, it is possible to quickly develop models of what the organization does without being dragged into an extended debate on how the organization does it. Once a basic functional decomposition diagram has been developed, it becomes possible to layer heat-maps on top of this diagram to show scope and decisions. For example, the capabilities to be implemented during the different phases of a change program.

This diagram can be enriched using links to other parts of the model, to indicate, for example, which application supports which function, which role uses which function, and so on.

functionnal-decomposition-diagram
Main functions of the DiscountTravel company

functionFunction: Describes one function of the organization.

Goal/Objective/Service diagrams

The purpose of a Goal/Objective/Service diagram is to define the ways in which a service contributes to the achievement of a business vision or strategy.

Services are associated with the drivers, goals, objectives, and measures that they support, allowing the enterprise to understand which services contribute to similar aspects of business performance. The Goal/Objective/Service diagram also provides qualitative input on what constitutes high performance for a particular service.

goal-objective-service-diagram
Goal/Objective/Service diagram

business-service-32Business service: Represents a service provided by the business, which may then be realized by one or more IS services.

goalGoal: This is a goal or objective of the enterprise.

trace-linkGeneral purpose traceability link: Determines that the origin of the trace has been founded on the trace destination during its definition.

Login

Sign in to use the forum and be informed of the latest news.

Latest comments